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Format: 2014-04-20
Format: 2014-04-20
Two Officers Slain in St. Petersburg
TAMPA (2012-01-01)
Length: (15:43)

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NPR's New Boss Gary Knell
TAMPA (2011-12-27)
Length: (3:28)

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USF College of Business 25 Under 25 honorees at Busch Gardens
USF’s College of Business has once again picked its “25 Under 25,” a collection of students who excel both inside and outside of the classroom. University Beat on WUSF TV introduces you to some of these incredible undergraduates at a ceremony recently held in their honor.

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USF College of Business 25 Under 25 honorees, including Most Outstanding Student Chaz Hine (2nd from left), meet with a local business leader
All college kids are remarkable in their own way…and this week’s University Beat introduces you to some who really stand out in a crowd! From a young Haitian woman who graduated college at the age of 20 to a rock-climbing billboard model to an opera-singing football player, USF's College of Business has honored some of its outstanding students with a program called "25 Under 25." This week's University Beat introduces you to some of the honorees and tells you which one was named the "most remarkable" student.
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Printed profiles of 25 Under 25 honorees
Video profiles of 25 Under 25 honorees

Chaz Hine sings "Amazing Grace" during the 2009 USF Athletics Welcome Back dinner
St. Pete Times article on Chaz, including video of an opera performance

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Chaz Hine, a USF Management major & starting offensive lineman on the USF football team, talks about the extra-curricular projects that helped him win “most outstanding student” in the College of Business’ “25 Under 25” program. Also, his offensive line coach, Steve Shankweiler, shares his opinions about Chaz.

Chaz Hine talks what it felt like to win “most outstanding student” in the College of Business’ “25 Under 25” program.

Chaz Hine sings opera.

Accounting major Hefgine Fils-Aime, who graduated in May at the age of 20, talks about some of her experiences at USF. She’s doing a summer internship at PricewaterhouseCoopers, and has received a scholarship to pursue her masters in accounting at Wake Forest University.

International Business / Economics major Ross O'Bryan speaks about one of the best lessons he learned at USF, his future plans, and his experience as a model.

Cubans Find "Success in Exile"
LAKELAND (2011-12-24)
Length: (4:40)

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Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition
One thousand miles. That's how far a group of people will be walking through the heart of Florida. And they'll do it for 100 days straight - through swamps, cattle pasture and subdivisions on the creeping edge of suburbia. They're not just doing it to get their feet wet. It's called the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. They're doing it to focus public attention on protecting connected wild areas to create a wildlife corridor from the Everglades to Georgia. Much of that corridor has been fragmented, leaving many animals vulnerable in much of their natural range. They'll trek through the Shark Valley Slough, delve into the watery heart of the Everglades, skirt around Lake Okeechobee and slog up the Kissimmee River Valley. The team will document the corridor through photography, video streams, radio reports as well as daily updates on social media and digital networks. We recently spoke with photojournalist Carlton Ward Jr., documentary filmmaker Elam Stoltzfus and bear biologist Joe Guthrie as they prepared for the journey. You can learn more about the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition by going to their web site. Reports on the progress of the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition will air on both WUSF 89.7 and WUSF TV. All Reports are made possible by our production sponsor, Mosaic.
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A man jumps from the Sunshine Skyway…and survives. A new governor enters and a columnist leaves. And a Sarasota school remember being there when a President learned about the 9/11 attacks. Here are what WUSF’s news team chose as our top stories of 2011, in no particular order. 1. More police officers killed It was another rough year for police in our region. In December, Lakeland police Officer Arnulfo Crispin, was shot and killed in the line of duty. In January, fugitive Hydra Lacy Junior, cornered in an attic, shot and killed Sgt. Thomas Baitinger and Officer Jeffrey Yaslowitz. Then just a month later, according to police, a teenager shot and killed Officer David Crawford. WUSF reporter Steve Newborn went to cover the first slayings…and was surprised when some people in the mostly African-American crowd heckled the police officers who arrived at the scene. Of course, there’s a history there – including the 1996 shooting death of 18-year-old TyRon Lewis by the police. We went to Bethel Community Baptist church in St. Petersburg to talk about the relationship between police and the black community with state Sen. Darryl Rouson and St. Petersburg resident Lisa Wheeler-Brown. 2. Deaths at Assisted Living Facilities An investigation by the Miami Herald and public radio station WLRN revealed dozens of questionable deaths in assisted living facilities statewide. And one case in particular, that of Aurora Noves who drowned at age 85, exposes both the failings of some faciltieis, and the failings of state oversight. 3. Governor Scott’s First Year The lack of regulation at Assisted Living Facilities was just one of the issues we discussed with Governor Rick Scott earlier this year. After declining interviews with many media outlets, Scott reversed course this summer amid record-low approval ratings. Scott sat down with WUSF News Director Scott Finn to discuss state employee morale, the coarsening of political discourse, and the proper balance between protecting our seniors and cutting budgets for agencies that regulate assisted living facilities. 4. St. Petersburg Times Columnist Howard Troxler Leaves Florida Shortly after Governor Scott and the Legislature succeeded in passing most of their conservative agenda, long-time St. Petersburg Times columnist Howard Troxler announced he was leaving Florida. Not retiring. Not taking another job. Just…leaving. WUSF’s Bobbie O’Brien tried to find out why. Troxler is a symbol of the anger among some Floridians that’s led to Gov. Scott’s low approval ratings. 5. Surviving a Jump From the Sunshine Skyway Bridge The Sunshine Skyway Bridge is an iconic symbol of the Tampa Bay region. It’s also unfortunately an attractive place for people who want to end their lives. But not everyone who jumps, dies. Hanns Jones survived, and became the subject of a radio documentary by Lakeland native Rich Halten called “Splash.” Here’s an excerpt. 6. The Pet Goat: Witness to 9/11 History We end our look back on 2011 with a story that looks back on ANOTHER day ten years earlier. On Sept. 11, 2001, WUSF’s Steve Newborn went to cover President Bush at an elementary school in Sarasota. They had no idea they’d become witnesses to history.
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Top Six News Stories of 2011 for Tampa Bay
TAMPA (2011-12-26)
Length: (28:30)

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Charter schools are supposed to accept students regardless of ability…but in Florida, many are not. Charter schools are designed to be an alternative for students who aren’t happy with their neighborhood school. But an investigation by StateImpact Florida and the Miami Herald found that charter schools aren’t an option for many students with severe disabilities. Only 14 percent of charter schools serve kids with severe disabilities, compared to half of traditional public schools. StateImpact Florida reporters Sarah Gonzalez and John O’Connor tell us the story behind their investigation, and the impact it is having. We also talk with Kathleen McGrory of the Miami Herald. She and reporter Scott Hiaasen published “Cashing in on Kids,” a six-month investigation into charter schools.
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USF Japanese students & a special guest (center) at 2011 International Festival
Culture, customs, costumes and cuisine were all on display at the recent USF International Festival. Come along as University Beat on WUSF TV takes you to an event that showed off the ethnic diversity that helps make up USF.

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Medical anthropologist Doctor Paul Farmer talks with USF graduate students
Medical anthropologist, Doctor Paul Farmer, has been praised for his humanitarian work while also raising controversy for his views on topics like the recovery efforts in post-earthquake Haiti. Farmer was a recipient of an honorary degree at USF’s recent commencement ceremony, and afterwards, he talked to a class of USF graduate students for almost two hours. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 takes you to that meeting and introduces you to the always outspoken Farmer.
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International Festival
USF International Festival website

Dr. Paul Farmer
Dr. Paul Farmer, Chair, Dept. of Global Health & Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School / Founding dir., Partners in Health
paul_farmer@hms.harvard.edu

Partners in Health website
Website for Mirebalais Hospital, currently under construction in Haiti

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Maria Crummett, the Associate Vice President for Global Affairs at USF World, says it’s important that student groups are the ones that organize and run the USF International Festival.

Stacy Koshko, the Assistant Director of the USF Office of Multicultural Affairs, says international travel benefits American students. She also talks about a “buddy program” her office is putting together that matches U-S students with foreign ones.

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Dr. Paul Farmer, the Chair of Harvard Medical School’s Dept. of Global Health & Social Medicine, explains why he thinks healthcare is a basic human right.

Dr. Paul Farmer talks about how a trip to Haiti between college and medical school put him on this path.

USF Anthropology Professor Linda Whiteford, who nominated Paul Farmer for the honorary USF degree, talks about her history with Farmer and what the graduate students got out of sitting down to talk to him for two hours.

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