On Demand - Video Content

Format: 2014-04-19
Format: 2014-04-19
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Program

USF students & Rocky the Bull begin the "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes"
While the image of male USF students walking around campus in high heels is pretty funny, the reason why a few hundred of them recently did so is decidedly serious. This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes," an event designed to raise awareness about relationship violence and sexual assault.

On the radio

USF St. Pete “Lead, Learn and Serve” students meet w/local community leaders
Students in USF Saint Petersburg’s Leadership program are teaming up with faculty and local community members on “Creating Sustainable Communities,” a project inspired by author and educator Margaret J. Wheatley. This week’s University Beat on WUSF 89.7 FM tells you more about the project and Dr. Wheatley’s upcoming appearance at USF Saint Pete.
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More of USF's "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" event with some of the organizers and participants.

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Stephen Ritch, Director of the USF St. Petersburg Bishop Center for Ethical Leadership, answers the questions “Why the concept of ‘Creating Sustainable Communities’ and what does such work entail?”

Stephen Ritch talks about how the Leadership program and the Sustainable Communities project fit into USF’s overall goals.

MILE IN HER SHOES
USF NITE: niteusf@hotmail.com

USF Advocacy Program: 813-974-5756

USF Advocacy Program's Crime Victim Helpline: 813-974-5757

Program

woman voting
This week we're going through the many levels of civic engagement that you can find in Florida. Carson Cooper introduces us to the up-and-coming political &new-wave," and describes how the use of high-tech social networking is becoming the norm. Irene Mayer talks with members of a Pasco County group, Protectors of Florida’s Legacy, that succeeded in turning down a Class 1 Landfill proposal in Dade City. The group argued that the project would have potentially damaged the natural resources in the area, and created an eyesore for the community. Irene also sits down with a community organizer from the NAACP, and a local activist from Florida Voices for Animals, to see how they use different approaches to achieve their goals. Larry Elliston introduces us to Stefani Busansky. Inspired by her daughter's 2001 diagnosis of cerebral palsy, Busansky turned her dream of a playground where kids of all abilities could play together into a reality.

On the radio

mortgage crisis
The number of foreclosures in Florida has quadrupled since 2006. In Bradenton and Sarasota alone, foreclosures rose 600 percent between 2006 and 2008. This week on Florida Matters, we’re examining the impact of foreclosure on our community. We’ll answer listener-submitted questions about mortgage problems and connect you with resources to help if you’re facing the prospect of losing your home.
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TO FIND HELP:

Call 211

Visit our special mortgage crisis Web site at http://www.tampabaymortgagecrisis.org

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Irene Maher speaks with Pasco County activists from Protectors of Florida's Legacy, a group that succeeded in turning down a Class 1 Landfill proposal in Dade City. Members of the group argued that the project would have potentially damaged the natural resources in the area, creating an eyesore for the community.

Florida Matters host Irene Maher sits down with two community organizers - Don Brown from the NAACP's Florida Conference, and Nikki Benoit from Florida Voices for Animals - to discuss how they use different approaches to achieve their goals.

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Mary Frances Cormican says she and other realtors are busy selling homes right now but are having difficulty with an influx of short sales on the market. (1:11)

Cormican explains how she thinks the Save Our Homes property tax cap exacerbated the housing bubble a few years ago. (1:45)

Anthony DiMarco describes how some lenders are tightening requirements for mortgages now and how the mortgage lending market is changing. (2:26)

Cormican and Bill Sanchez discuss what impact affordable housing created through the Community Reinvestment Act has had on the housing crisis. (2:22)

February 20, 2009
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Program

USF students & Rocky the Bull begin the "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes"
While the image of male USF students walking around campus in high heels is pretty funny, the reason why a few hundred of them recently did so is decidedly serious. This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes," an event designed to raise awareness about relationship violence and sexual assault.

On the radio

USF students at the Marshall Student Center for "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes"
A few hundred male USF students learned what it's like to walk a mile in women's shoes - figuratively AND literally - at a sexual-assault awareness event. This week's University Beat on WUSF-FM brings you the high-heeled details of the first walk on a college campus to be recognized by the national "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" organization.
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More of USF's "Walk a Mile in Her Shoes" event with some of the organizers and participants.

USF NITE: niteusf@hotmail.com

USF Advocacy Program: 813-974-5756

USF Advocacy Program's Crime Victim Helpline: 813-974-5757

Program

Larry Elliston on the waterfront
This week Larry Elliston shares the stories of Floridians who have helped others move to Florida from overseas and "Dr. Bob" who volunteers his time to offer better healthcare. Plus, we'll meet a man who used his experience in prison to turn his life around and help others after he was released.

On the radio

Florida beach
This week on Florida Matters, we’re revisiting some of the interesting conversations you’ve made possible with your support. Explore bullying in our schools – how big is the problem and what are schools doing about it? Learn about the master plan for getting around the Bay area for the next 40 years. And meet some local job-seekers doing whatever they can to make ends meet.
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May 29, 2009
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USF authors sign their work at 2008’s St. Petersburg Times Festival of Reading.
Over fifty authors, including a number of Pulitzer Prize winners, will be coming to USF Saint Petersburg Saturday, October 24, for the Seventeenth Annual Saint Petersburg Times "Festival of Reading." This week's University Beat on WUSF TV takes a look at some of the writers who'll be meeting the public and talking about their latest works.

On the radio

Panel at the USF Hate Crimes Summit
According to government figures, a hate crime is reported somewhere in the US every hour of everyday...and thousands more every year go unreported. This week's University Beat on WUSF 89.7 FM takes you to a recent USF summit where attendees didn't just hear facts like these, but also personal stories from people affected by such crimes.
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St. Petersburg Times book editor Colette Bancroft talks about the large number of Pulitzer Prize winners, as well as Times' staffers, who will be appearing at the Festival of Reading.

Ms. Bancroft says some of the other authors appearing at the Festival come from the worlds of politics, acting, music and the news media.

USF St. Pete Assoc. Prof. of Art History Sheramy Bundrick talks about her research for her book, "Sunflowers: A Novel of Vincent van Gogh," and reads a passage from it.

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Christopher Davis, FBI Asst. Special Agent-in-Charge, talks about the murder of James Byrd, Jr. in Jasper, TX, in 1998. (WARNING: graphic content)

Mark Potok, Esq., Staff Dir. of the Intelligence Project, Southern Poverty Law Center, speaks about the kinds of hate crimes we're seeing today.

In addition to the Festival, Sheramy Bundrick will be signing her book "Sunflowers: A Novel of Vincent van Gogh," October 15 at 4:00 PM at the Nelson Poynter Memorial Library at USF St. Petersburg.

Program

Larry Elliston at the park
What does a paintbrush, a park and a bicycle all have in common? Find out this week on Florida Matters as co-host Larry Elliston brings us a collection of Florida Stories that will inspire you to look at things in a new way.

On the radio

A swan, the symbol of Lakeland
After 17 years with Buddy Fletcher at the helm, a new mayor will take over in Lakeland. Those who want the job include two long-time city officials and a young newcomer to city politics. The new leader will face a deep recession in Florida and the nation and will be involved in ongoing discussions about commuter and high-speed rail in Central Florida. Meet the candidates this week on the show.
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Gow Fields provides more background on how Lakeland found out about the SunRail commuter train proposal and the possible implications of the proposed system. (2:38)

The candidates outline their visions for the future of Lakeland's downtown area. (3:25)

Elliott Dorsch shares one good idea to invigorate what he calls the stale city government. Jim Verplanck and Gow Fields also offer some ideas about how they would freshen the city's leadership. (5:12)

May 22, 2009
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Program

USF authors sign their work at 2008’s St. Petersburg Times Festival of Reading.
Over fifty authors, including a number of Pulitzer Prize winners, will be coming to USF Saint Petersburg Saturday, October 24, for the Seventeenth Annual Saint Petersburg Times "Festival of Reading." This week's University Beat on WUSF TV takes a look at some of the writers who'll be meeting the public and talking about their latest works.

On the radio

Festival of Reading logo
This week's University Beat on WUSF 89.7 FM brings you a preview of the Saint Petersburg Times "Festival of Reading" and introduces you to a pair of USF faculty members who will be presenting their new books there.
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St. Petersburg Times book editor Colette Bancroft talks about the large number of Pulitzer Prize winners, as well as Times' staffers, who will be appearing at the Festival of Reading.

Ms. Bancroft says some of the other authors appearing at the Festival come from the worlds of politics, acting, music and the news media.

USF St. Pete Assoc. Prof. of Art History Sheramy Bundrick talks about her research for her book, "Sunflowers: A Novel of Vincent van Gogh," and reads a passage from it.

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Colette Bancroft & Professor Tony Silvia, Director of USF St. Pete's Dept. of Journalism & Media Studies, say that, in spite of the economy, both the newspaper and the community need the Festival.

Professor Silvia talks about his book, "Fathers and Sons in Baseball Broadcasting," and reads a passage from it.

In addition to the Festival, Sheramy Bundrick will be signing her book "Sunflowers: A Novel of Vincent van Gogh," October 15 at 4:00 PM at the Nelson Poynter Memorial Library at USF St. Petersburg.

Program

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cuban refugees
This week we meet up with some of Florida’s Cuban Americans to discuss our state's history with Cuba and our strained relationship, that continues today. We also talk embargo with some early exiles of the Castro revolution. We hear from Roberto Quiros, a Tampa man who escaped Cuba in 1994 by raft as he shares the drama of his experience.

On the radio

H1N1 flu image, with woman in surgical mask
This week, state health officials said 102 people have died from swine flu in Florida. Doctors say the virus usually causes only a mild illness, and those who have died had underlying medical conditions. Still, all the talk of a swine flu pandemic has people worried, especially about school children. This week: an update on swine flu in the Bay area, and what to expect for the rest of flu season.
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Florida Flu Information Line 1-877-352-3581

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Dr. Julia Gill explains how health officials plan for the unexpected when trying to prevent the spread of diseases like H1N1 swine flu. She also describes how plans for a pandemic flu outbreak anticipated a much deadlier virus than the H1N1 flu has been. (1:24)

Gill explains why there are two flu vaccines this year: one for the so-called seasonal flu and one for the H1N1 swine flu. (1:14)

Dr. Daniel Haight says media coverage that focuses on cases at a single school can be misleading and unfair to that school. He says there are swine flu cases everywhere, but they might not be reported by parents who keep their children home. (0:52)

Linda Troupe and Sherri Reynolds talk about how their districts are prepared to continue teaching children if many students and teachers are infected with the flu. (1:34)

March 20, 2009
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Program

A Lego Mindstorm NXT soccer-playing robot.
This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to the sidelines as a group of students in a USF College of Engineering research program put their custom-made Lego robots to the test in a high-tech game of soccer.

On the radio

Courtesy Candace C. Mundy/Focus From The Heart, LLC
The interconnected concerns over climate change, energy policy and national security recently took center stage at the University of South Florida, as former U-S Senators Bob Graham and John Warner were joined by military and science experts at a Pew Project Forum. This week’s University Beat takes you there and tells you how some feel that climate change could cause a domino effect ending in global conflict.
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TV:
Miguel Labrador, Assoc. Professor, USF Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering
labrador@cse.usf.edu or 813-974-3260

RADIO:
Dr. Thomas L. Crisman, USF Patel Professor of Environment
tcrisman@cas.usf.edu or 813-974-5134

Program

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food from different cultures
Join us as we explore the international diversity of the Bay Area. Florida is a melting pot, an international community that represents countries from around the globe. So what do foreigners bring to the table? We'll answer that question, literally, as we take a look at the types of food you can find in Florida thanks to our diverse international culture. We head to Pinellas county and meet some young immigrants in the public school system who are integrating into the American way of life. And Larry Elliston introduces us to a family who are happy to now call America home.

On the radio

cell phone receiving text message
Staffers at Florida’s utility regulator have been in trouble lately for giving their cell phones’ instant messaging codes to power company officials. Turns out, that could violate the state’s broad public records and open government laws if there is no record kept of conversations. This week, we’ll look at the impact on open government of rapid changes in the ways we communicate with each other.
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Mary Ellen Klas describes how she thinks BlackBerry smart phones and other mobile technologies have changed the culture of government -- and the impact of news coverage about government. (1:36)

Klas explains how technology like mobile instant messaging (like PIN messaging) has made covering government more difficult for her and her colleagues. (1:02)

Barbara Petersen talks more about the Dale Earnhardt autopsy photo case in 2001 and balancing individuals' right to privacy and the public's right of access. (3:22)

Joe Adams talks about the increasing number of local communities creating pages on social networking sites like Facebook and how that can be beneficial for citizens as long as officials realize any communication that happens through the pages is still public record. (1:36)

Our panel looks to the future of technology and public records, saying the key is to maintain access to government for citizens and to use technology to do that. (3:36)

May 8, 2009
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Program

A Lego Mindstorm NXT soccer-playing robot.
This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to the sidelines as a group of students in a USF College of Engineering research program put their custom-made Lego robots to the test in a high-tech game of soccer.

On the radio

Lego Mindstorm NXT Robots playing soccer. The blue team beat the purple team 4-1
Of the thousands of ways robots can be used today, teaching them to play soccer may not seem to be one of the best ones; but this week's University Beat on WUSF 89.7 FM tells you how a research program at USF's College of Engineering that culminates in a match between two teams of robots built out of Legos is increasing knowledge while drawing new students to the subject.
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Miguel Labrador, Assoc. Professor, USF Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering
E-mail: labrador@cse.usf.edu or 813-974-3260

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police officer
This week we're taking a serious look at the state of crime in our area. We'll ask local law enforcement to weigh in on the trends they're seeing, and discuss ways we can all avoid becoming victims. And we'll take a look at the relationship between education and crime. Then Larry Elliston introduces us to a former convict who turned his life around and hopes to inspire others to do the same.

On the radio

generic voting ballot
A couple of weeks ago, 10 St. Petersburg residents were vying to be the city’s next mayor. Now, that list has only two names on it. The winner will inherit a list of unresolved issues, like deciding the future of downtown -- including BayWalk and the Pier -- and whether to build a new baseball stadium. We’ll meet the candidates and find out what they think, this week.
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Listen to Kathleen Ford explain more about how she would spend some of the city's reserve funds while Bill Foster describes why he’s opposed to the idea. (2:09)

Listen to an expanded version of our conversation about the possibility of a new stadium in St. Petersburg for the Rays. (5:49)

Listen to Ford and Foster talk about the future of regional transportation, including the plans for light rail advocated by Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio. (2:55)

Foster and Ford talk about BayWalk and how public safety issues and the economy contributed to the troubles at the struggling retail center. They also tell us whether they support a proposal to turn over a portion of public sidewalk to the plaza. (4:45)

May 15, 2009

Program

doctors using the da Vinci system
USF is one of two centers nationwide to use a high-tech robotic-assisted system to train doctors and surgical students on the latest minimally-invasive surgical procedures. This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to the unveiling of the da Vinci Surgical System and shows you how it's improving both physicians' skill and patient care.

On the radio

USF President Dr. Judy Genshaft and Admiral Patrick Dunne
The University of South Florida is the first school in the nation to team with the Department of Veterans Affairs in an effort to support returning troops who enroll for classes under the new G-I Bill this fall. This week's University Beat takes a closer look at "VetSuccess on Campus" and how it's going to help those who've served our country.
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Radio:
Kristin Adams, USF Representative, VetSuccess on Campus
E-mail: kristin.adams@va.gov or 813-974-9281

TV:
Nikki LeClair, BS CME Coordinator, USF Health Continuing Professional Development
E-mail: nleclair@health.usf.edu or 813-974-2728

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At a ceremony marking the signing of the "VetSuccess on Campus" agreement between USF and the Department of Veterans Affairs, USF President Dr. Judy Genshaft talks about what the University can do for returning troops and other veterans.

Admiral Patrick Dunne, the Department of Veterans Affairs' Under Secretary for Benefits, says veterans bring something different to a classroom and university campus.

Kristin Adams, the VA's VetSuccess on Campus USF Representative, talks about his experiences as both a veteran and a USF graduate.

Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio & Hillsborough County Commissioner Mark Sharpe talk about how the da Vinci Center and USF will help the Tampa Bay area.

Dr. Cheryl Jordan talks about the recovery process that followed her da Vinci-assisted hysterectomy.

Dr. Alexander Rosemurgy, USF Health's Assoc. Dean of Medical Simulation & Academic Enrichment, says while the da Vinci system offers surgeons a great deal of control, it's only the latest step in the evolution of robot-assisted surgery.

Dr. Stephen Klasko, CEO of USF Health and Dean of the College of Medicine, speaks at the former opening of the da Vinci Center for Computer Assisted Surgery.

Program

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man in a garden
Going green is red hot these days, but you might not be aware of all the different ways you can be friendlier to the environment while improving your own life. Host Irene Maher introduces us to Jim Kovaleski, of New Port Richey, who combines form and function by turning his entire yard into a garden of "eat'n." Meanwhile, Carson Cooper takes us to Sweetwater Organic Community Farm, a little bit of country right in the heart of the city. Later, Kim Button, from Greenwell Consulting, shows us how to rid your body and home of unnecessary chemicals. Switching gears over to the alternative energy side, you'll also meet a man who's "green" approach to gas-guzzling vehicles caused a seafood company out of Orlando to completely restructure their business. Larry Elliston then introduces us to a teacher in St. Petersburg who turned an energy-saving house project into a valuable learning lesson for her class.

On the radio

Two beams of light symbolize the fallen twin towers of the World Trade Center
The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, are imprinted on the nation’s collective psyche, influencing everything from the nation’s foreign policy and how we travel by air to where our military forces are deployed and how we train first responders. We note the anniversary of the attacks this week, focusing on how the events of that day changed life -- and lives -- in the Bay area.
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Ten Most Important Fruits and Vegetables to Buy Organic:
1. Peaches
2. Apples
3. Sweet Bell Peppers
4. Celery
5. Nectarines
6. Strawberries
7. Cherries
8. Lettuce
9. Grapes-Imported
10. Pears

Based on Pesticide Levels Studies by the Environmental Working Group

Definitions:

Going Green: A phrase referring to individual action that a person can consciously take to curb harmful effects on the environment through consumer habits, behavior, and lifestyle.

Sustainable: Actions and products that meet current needs without sacrificing the ability of future generations to meet theirs. Sustainability is a broad term and often refers to the desire to provide the best outcomes for the human and natural environments both now and into the indefinite future.

Carbon Footprint: The total amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases emitted over the full lifecycle of a product or service, expressed as grams of CO2 equivalents. Greenhouse gases contribute to global warming and climate change, so reducing carbon footprints is desirable for a healthier earth.

Co-op: Short for co-operative. Worker cooperatives are owned and democratically controlled by its workers. Since the co-op is worker-owned and membership is not compulsory, this type of manufacturing set-up avoids exploitation of its workers.

Green Building: A green building is designed to conserve resources and reduce negative impacts on the environment - whether it is energy, water, building materials or land. Compared to conventional construction, green buildings may use one or more renewable energy systems for heating and cooling, such as solar electric, solar hot water, geothermal, bio mass, or any combinaion of these.

Source - http://lohas.com/glossary.html

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Irene speaks to Kim Button, an Eco-Wellness consultant, from Greenwell Consulting in Orlando, Florida.

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Listen to a full description of the events at Emma E. Booker Elementary the morning of Sept. 11, 2001 from Dwana Washington. (5:12)

Brian Muldowney describes his experience of the famous moment a few days after the attacks when President Bush stood at Ground Zero. (1:18)

Brian Muldowney talks about the young children who come through his fire station for tours and demonstrations and the fact that many of them weren't alive when the Sept. 11 attacks happened. (1:12)

April 17, 2009

Program

doctors using the da Vinci system
USF is one of two centers nationwide to use a high-tech robotic-assisted system to train doctors and surgical students on the latest minimally-invasive surgical procedures. This week's University Beat on WUSF-TV takes you to the unveiling of the da Vinci Surgical System and shows you how it's improving both physicians' skill and patient care.

On the radio

Photo Courtesy: USF Health
As USF Health debuts its new four million dollar da Vinci Center for Computer Assisted Surgery, this week's University Beat on WUSF-FM shows you the human side of high-tech surgery as we introduce you to a patient whose remarkable recovery may one day be the rule and not the exception.
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Nikki LeClair, BS CME Coordinator, USF Health Continuing Professional Development
E-mail: nleclair@health.usf.edu or 813-974-2728

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Tampa Mayor Pam Iorio & Hillsborough County Commissioner Mark Sharpe talk about how the da Vinci Center and USF will help the Tampa Bay area.

Dr. Cheryl Jordan talks about the recovery process that followed her da Vinci-assisted hysterectomy.

Dr. Alexander Rosemurgy, USF Health's Assoc. Dean of Medical Simulation & Academic Enrichment, says while the da Vinci system offers surgeons a great deal of control, it's only the latest step in the evolution of robot-assisted surgery.

Dr. Stephen Klasko, CEO of USF Health and Dean of the College of Medicine, speaks at the former opening of the da Vinci Center for Computer Assisted Surgery.

Program

people looking for jobs and posting resumes online
Whether you’re a parent pinching pennies, or a policy-maker trying to find the best ways to allocate funds, the economy is probably at the forefront of your mind these days. Host Irene Maher meets with area economic development council directors to see how they’re weathering the storm and gearing up for President Obama’s stimulus package. Meanwhile, Carson Cooper introduces us to Sue Heinz, a married mother of four from Sarasota featured in Parade Magazine and on The Oprah Winfrey Show for her tried-and-true thrifty techniques for living. You’ll also get a chance to peek behind the counter and see what it’s like to work as a job placement counselor during tough economic times, as Larry Elliston heads to the Tampa Bay Workforce Alliance.

On the radio

money and eggs in a nest
As our current recession has persisted -- and even deepened -- we’ve heard the stories of people cutting back to make ends meet. Sometimes that means changing investment strategies or even reducing contributions to retirement accounts because paying the bills today demands it. This week, financial advisors offer their take on keeping your financial house in order through a sour economy.
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Jonathan Wax and Greg Ghodsi talk about some of the politics of the economy right now and whether the markets are operating more on hope or on fear. (3:48)

Greg Ghodsi describes how perceptions can create a snowball effect in the economy. He suggests that’s evident now because people who still have jobs are spending less and saving more. (2:28)

Greg Ghodsi explains what came out of discussions to finance the bank bailout with government-issued bonds like the war bonds used to pay for World War II. (1:05)

February 6, 2009

Program

High school teachers in an Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI) Chemistry
While Advanced Placement classes are challenging to high school students, they're not exactly easy for the teachers either! USF's David C. Anchin Center and the College of Education recently hosted the AP Summer Institute, and this week's University Beat on WUSF takes you inside the classrooms and laboratories and speaks to some of the teachers, ranging from first-time AP instructors looking for pointers to long-time veterans refreshing their skills.

On the radio

screen shot of the e-mailed prescriptions
USF Health is taking a leading role in changing the face of healthcare through a new public-private partnership called "PaperFree Tampa Bay." This week's University Beat tells you how USF Health is trying to get physicians in the Bay area to convert from paper prescriptions to electronic prescribing, which will improve patient safety and eventually reduce costs.
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Radio:
Pamela Martin, RN, MN, LHCRM, ARM, PaperFree Tampa Bay Project Manager
E-mail: pmartin@health.usf.edu or 813-974-3650

TV:
David C. Anchin Center at USF's College of Education
813-974-5959

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Brian Mann, the Associate Director of the USF Anchin Center and Director for the Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI), talks about the Institute's opening day School Superintendents' Roundtable and how hosting the APSI benefits USF.

A pair of new AP teachers, Courtney Stuckwisch (English, G.W. Carver HS in New Orleans) & Valery Louisdhon (Chemistry, King HS in Tampa), explain what they were learning in the classroom and the laboratory.

Courtney Stuckwisch on her experiences with "Teach For America" and as a teacher in New Orleans' Upper Ninth Ward.

Genevieve Delfosse, an APSI instructor and French teacher at Jefferson HS in Alexandria, VA, talks about the advantages of "immersion teaching" for foreign languages.

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Dr. Stephen Klasko, CEO of USF Health and Dean of the College of Medicine, on how PaperFree Tampa Bay, along with other recent developments, helps advance USF Health's reputation on the worldwide stage.

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children at school
You can't live in Florida without hearing about FCAT on the news. It's a lightning rod issue, and the Florida legislature recently approved a new bill that will shake things up a bit more. We speak with a teacher, a former administrator, a researcher and a parent to learn their views on the FCAT. Host Irene Maher then introduces us to a group of leaders in Pinellas County determined help students caught in the achievement gap. Larry Elliston introduces us to tipper the dog, who's having a dog-gone good time getting kids excited to read.

On the radio

gun on top of money
Conventional wisdom says crime rises when the economy goes bad; studies say that has been true during every recession since the 1950s. With the country facing what many consider to be the deepest recession in 70 years, that could mean a spike in criminal activity. This week, we'll learn more about why crime jumps in a bad economy, and see how that's really playing out in the Bay area.
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Florida CHOICES Career Interest Profiler

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Click on Florida Choices
2. Click "Jump In" (No ID required)
3. Click "Choices Planner" button
4. Click "Interest Profiler" link

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Robert Batey explains why we don't have reliable crime data in the U.S. and talks about whether police and prosecutors give people without jobs different treatment. (3:47)

Sheriff Grady Judd explains how crime analysis and what he calls “proactive policing” began in Polk County a decade ago. (2:57)

Major Harold Winsett explains the Hillsborough Sheriff's Office process of analyzing cases in each of its divisions and adjusting crime-fighting strategies. (1:35)

February 27, 2009

Program

High school teachers in an Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI) Chemistry
While Advanced Placement classes are challenging to high school students, they're not exactly easy for the teachers either! USF's David C. Anchin Center and the College of Education recently hosted the AP Summer Institute, and this week's University Beat on WUSF takes you inside the classrooms and laboratories and speaks to some of the teachers, ranging from first-time AP instructors looking for pointers to long-time veterans refreshing their skills.

On the radio

High school teachers in an Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI) French cla
Over six hundred teachers from around the country came to the University of South Florida this summer for a week-long course to prepare them for the challenging year that awaits them as Advanced Placement instructors. This week's University Beat brings you a glimpse into the A-P Summer Institute and shows you how teachers get ready for classes that could make a huge difference in a student's college career.
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David C. Anchin Center at USF's College of Education
813-974-5959

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Brian Mann, the Associate Director of the USF Anchin Center and Director for the Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI), talks about the Institute's opening day School Superintendents' Roundtable and how hosting the APSI benefits USF.

A pair of new AP teachers, Courtney Stuckwisch (English, G.W. Carver HS in New Orleans) & Valery Louisdhon (Chemistry, King HS in Tampa), explain what they were learning in the classroom and the laboratory.

Courtney Stuckwisch on her experiences with "Teach For America" and as a teacher in New Orleans' Upper Ninth Ward.

Genevieve Delfosse, an APSI instructor and French teacher at Jefferson HS in Alexandria, VA, talks about the advantages of "immersion teaching" for foreign languages.

Program

Bay area homeowner
Meet four sets of homeowners living right here in the Bay Area that have experienced what it's like to go through a foreclosure. They could be your best friend, or co-worker, a family member, or your neighbor. None of them expected to lose their homes. With so many homeowners falling into foreclosure because of lost jobs or reduced hours, we'll also introduce you to an organization around the state that can help the unemployed find work. Last but not least, we tackle the topic of foreclosure scams and teach you the warning signs to look out for so you don't fall victim yourself.

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Image: The Top Tech Agent Real Estate Blog
The number of foreclosures in Florida has quadrupled since 2006. In Bradenton and Sarasota alone, foreclosures rose 600 percent between 2006 and 2008. This week on Florida Matters, we're examining the impact of foreclosure on our community. We'll answer listener-submitted questions about mortgage problems and connect you with resources to help if you're facing the prospect of losing your home.
For more information: 

If you believe you are a victim of a foreclosure scam, contact the Florida Attorney General's consumer hotline: 1-866-966-7226.

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Mary Frances Cormican says she and other realtors are busy selling homes right now but are having difficulty with an influx of short sales on the market. (1:11)

Cormican explains how she thinks the Save Our Homes property tax cap exacerbated the housing bubble a few years ago. (1:45)

Anthony DiMarco describes how some lenders are tightening requirements for mortgages now and how the mortgage lending market is changing. (2:26)

Cormican and Bill Sanchez discuss what impact affordable housing created through the Community Reinvestment Act has had on the housing crisis. (2:22)

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Program

Ataxia patient Susan Wier takes part in physical therapy at USF
Ataxia is a group of debilitating neurological diseases that affects 150-thousand Americans, causing serious problems with movement, balance, speech and vision. This week's University Beat looks at the revolutionary treatment research being done at USF and tells you how you can help in the effort by taking part in a series of events, including a symposium and a fund-raising dinner, later this month.

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Outside the new Juniper-Poplar Residence Hall
With the start of the school year just around the corner, the University of South Florida is opening the doors on its newest and largest residence hall. This week's University Beat takes you inside the Juniper-Poplar Residence Hall and shows you how it fits into USF officials' plan to help new students graduate within four years.
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Housing & Residential Education, USF Division of Student Affairs
E-mail: help@housing.usf.edu or 813-974-0001

TV:
Amber Miller, USF Ataxia Research Center (treatment and clinical trials/research)
813-974-5909

Stephanie Amberg, First Annual FARA (Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance) Energy Ball & related events, August 27-29
813-282-1225

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Video from the grand opening of USF's Juniper-Poplar Residence Hall, as well as a tour of the new building.

Dr. Teresa Zesiewicz, the director of USF's Ataxia Research Center, talks about the work being done at the Center and some of the challenges doctors face in treating the disease.

Dr. Zesiewicz describes how patient Susan Wier has progressed thanks to the smoking cessation drug, Chantix.

A look at one of the tools USF's School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences is using to help ataxia patients like Susan Wier.

Program

On the radio

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Ataxia is a group of debilitating neurological diseases that affects 150-thousand Americans, causing serious problems with movement, balance, speech and vision. This week's University Beat looks at the revolutionary treatment research being done at USF and tells you how you can help in the effort by taking part in a series of events, including a symposium and a fund-raising dinner, later this month.
For more information: 

Amber Miller, USF Ataxia Research Center (treatment and clinical trials/research)
813-974-5909

Stephanie Amberg, First Annual FARA (Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance) Energy Ball & related events, August 27-29
813-282-1225

Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

Dr. Teresa Zesiewicz, the director of USF's Ataxia Research Center, talks about the work being done at the Center and some of the challenges doctors face in treating the disease.

Dr. Zesiewicz describes how patient Susan Wier has progressed thanks to the smoking cessation drug, Chantix.

A look at one of the tools USF's School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences is using to help ataxia patients like Susan Wier.

Program

On the radio

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When U.S. Armed Service members return home from Iraq and Afghanistan, many are bothered by the kind of mental trauma that isn't easily seen or diagnosed. This week's University Beat shows us how USF is working with the V-A and the Department of Defense to help non-military mental healthcare providers treat those wounded warriors and tells the story of one such heroic Marine who's recovering from his injuries.
For more information: 

Gulfcoast North Area Health Education Center
813-929-1000

James A. Haley Veteran's Hospital OEF/OIF Program Manager
813-972-2000 ext. 3825

Military OneSource
1-800-342-9647

Video extras
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Retired U.S. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Jose Sanchez talks about why Marines find it difficult to talk about their mental and emotional issues after combat, the problems Reservists like himself sometimes face getting help, and why it's important both service members and their families get help.

Dr. Harold Kudler, the Mental Health Coordinator for the VA's Veterans Integrated Service Network #6, talks about Traumatic Brain Injury, or TBI, a growing problem among troops wounded in combat.

Dr. Kudler pays tribute to U.S. Navy Cmdr. Charles Keith Springle, a co-creator of the "Painting a Moving Train" program who was killed in Baghdad on May 11, 2009.

Program

glass blower
Whether you're an art connoisseur or paint-by-numbers is more your style, we're going to take you off the beaten path this week to introduce you to some bay area artists you may not know. We ask the question: What defines art? We'll show you a couple examples right here in the bay area that defy conventional standards of the definition. Host Irene Maher takes us to a small community in Pinellas County that is fired up about the arts. Carson Cooper introduces us to a photographer who considers conservation awareness just as important as the framing of his shot when considering his next project, while Susan Giles Wantuck travels to an artist's retreat right in Manatee county that provides the perfect backdrop for artistic creativity. And Larry Elliston introduces us to a painter who finds inspiration right in his own backyard.

On the radio

artist sketching
For many artists, their creations are a hobby, a passion, an outlet. Some artists make a go of it as professionals, depending on their creativity to provide an income. But is there demand for art in this sour economy? And how do you take that leap to turn art-making into a career? This week, learn how artists are making that happen.
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Listen to the group talk about mass reproductions of art and how that can be a revenue source for artists. (6:07)

Listen to Sharon Rose and Suzanne Williamson explain how the amount of money artists make can vary widely. (1:43)

April 24, 2009

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Shortly before President Obama's recent trip there, a number of USF representatives visited the African country of Ghana. This week's University Beat examines a new academic partnership that will benefit students and faculty at both USF and a paif of schools there - just the latest effort of the Patel Center for Global Solutions as it tries to strengthen USF's presence on the world stage.
For more information: 

USF Africa Initiatives Group

USF Patel Center for Global Solutions
813-974-2954

Video extras
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Dr. Kofi Glover, USF Assoc. Provost, talks about USF's Africa Initiatives Group, as well as the class he teaches that takes students to Ghana.

Dr. Glover shares his feelings on President Obama's recent trip to Ghana.

Betty Castor, former USF President & former Director of the Patel Center for Global Solutions, says it's important for USF to have a presence internationally. She also talks about her recent departure from USF.

Professor Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong, USF Dept. of Economics Chair, says, as an expanding university, USF has to make strides internationally.

Program

women exercising
Meet Dr. Eric Coris, a physician with USF Family Sports and Medicine, who shares a list of 47 health conditions that he says can be reduced, if not eliminated, by a modest amount of exercise. Viewers may be surprised to see even mental health conditions on the list. Carson Cooper demonstrates alternative forms of exercise that might tickle your funny bone as well as teach you how to strengthen your bones. Irene invites us into her kitchen for tips on better nutrition and how to make a heart-healthy meal. As the saying goes: It's not just what you do, it's also what you EAT. Then back to the studio for a demonstration from dietician Christine Miller on healthy choices for people who eat "on-the-go." And Larry Elliston introduces us to Dr. Bob, an 85-year-old retired physican who volunteers at a local health clinic and puts his own advice for exercise to practice.

On the radio

playing poker
This spring, lawmakers agreed to give the Seminole Tribe exclusive rights to some card games in exchange for millions of dollars in revenue sharing for the state budget. Negotiations are underway to finalize the details, including how much money the state gets. We have an update on a new gambling compact with the Seminoles, and how the deal will impact pari-mutuels in the Bay area.
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Host Irene Maher shares her recipe for healthy Creamy Chicken Potatoes.

Host Irene Maher shares a healthy recipe for Healthy Bran Muffins.

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George LeMieux says he doesn't expect lawmakers to come back for a special session on the budget, even if the Seminole Tribe and the state fail to agree on a gaming compact. (0:58)

LeMieux explains why the compact has to grant the Seminoles exclusivity for some gaming operations. (1:15)

LeMieux analyzes the political impact of expanded gambling in Florida on Gov. Crist. (1:20)

Sen. Dennis Jones explains why he thinks the current compact being negotiated is a great deal for the Seminole Tribe. (0:45)

Jones details some of the compromises that were made when lawmakers debated the framework of a gambling compact with the Seminole Tribe. (1:48)

Richard Winning describes the dual relationship between pari-mutuels and the state: they are partners in one sense and competitors in another. (1:05)

Winning talks about the future of gambling in Florida and the potential impact of more open travel to Cuba in the future. (1:27)

April 3, 2009

Program

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Thanks to a grant from the U.S. State Department, USF is giving almost forty teachers from Haiti and the Dominican Republic a summer school education in democracy. This week's University Beat joins the teachers-turned-students as they learn both inside and outside the classroom.
For more information: 

Dr. Bárbara Cruz, USF Professor of Social Science Education
E-mail: cruz@tempest.coedu.usf.edu or 813-974-2817

Video extras
Video extras descriptions: 

Dr. Bárbara Cruz, USF Professor of Social Science Education, talks about how various departments and organizations around USF are contributing to the program, the kinds of students the teachers are, and how they celebrated July 4.

Teacher/student Kenel Joseph explains how he teaches English to his fellow Haitians both in the classroom and on a weekly radio show (www.radioibo.ht/live).

Teacher/student Angelina Garcés Arias talks about how faculty from USF's English Language Institute are helping during "Democracy and Diversity."

Program

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cuban refugees
This week we meet up with some of Florida’s Cuban Americans to discuss our state's history with Cuba and our strained relationship, that continues today. We also talk embargo with some early exiles of the Castro revolution. We hear from Roberto Quiros, a Tampa man who escaped Cuba in 1994 by raft as he shares the drama of his experience.

On the radio

Burmese Python
Burmese pythons are getting plenty of attention lately. Congress is considering a federal ban on importing the snakes and moving them across state lines, and there has been talk of hunting the snakes down. Florida has many non-native plants, pests and animals that aren't as threatening to humans but still cause harm. This week, learn about some of those species and efforts to limit their impact.
Audio extras
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Capt. Jeff Fobb explains that most species of pythons aren't the huge 20-foot snakes often mentioned. (0:57)

Kristina Serbesoff-King describes a couple of invasive insects that she says are becoming problematic right now. (0:59

Listen to our guests’ thoughts about the proposed federal controls on exotic animals like pythons. (3:25)

March 20, 2009

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USF is teaming up with a number of groups to set up "The Innisbrook Leadership Institute." This week's University Beat takes you to the kick-off event for the Institute, which organizers hope will aid leaders of companies and organizations navigate through these difficult times.
For more information: 

John Lankford, CEO, Innisbrook Leadership Institute
E-mail: John.Lankford@ThinkInnisbrook.com or 727-942-5205

Video extras
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USF Health Chief Transformation Officer Mohamad Kasti talks about what each of the groups behind "The Innisbrook Leadership Institute" brings to the effort. He also speaks about how the Institute fits into USF's increased role as an economic engine for the community.

Innisbrook Resort & Golf Club Owner Sheila Johnson says the Institute is just the latest part of her efforts to make the Resort be known for more than just golf.

Program

cars on the highway
The Tampa Bay area poses a unique challenge for mass transportation. We'll take a look at the reasons we're behind other metropolitan areas our size and what community leaders are doing to increase our transportation options. You'll also see why having better transportation options makes for a better economy. And we'll hear from one man who has turned his commute to work into a way of life for his whole family.

On the radio

Light Rail
For years, the talk in Florida has been about mass transit. Here in the Bay area, a relatively new planning agency is taking a regional approach to transportation planning and has unveiled a 40-year master plan. Light rail, expanded bus routes, dedicated lanes - it's all in there. This week, TBARTA officials join us to anser the questions you've submitted about the plan.
Audio extras
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Bob Clifford describes how mass transit and future growth have to complement each other. (1:16)

Frank Hibbard and Clifford say the most frequent comments they have heard from the public have been "when can we have the system?" and "how much will it cost?" (1:20)

Clifford and Hibbard answer a listener question about building an underwater tunnel as part of the area's transit plans and explain why that has not been included. (0:44)

Bob Clifford explains that there are no rail systems in the nation making a profit, but that we build them for the public good, not to make money. (0:26)

March 27, 2009
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