Weekend Edition Sunday

Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein. Weekend Edition Sunday debuted on January 18, 1987, with host Susan Stamberg. Two years later, Liane Hansen took over the host chair, a position she held for 22 years. In that time, Hansen interviewed movers and shakers in politics, science, business and the arts. Her reporting travels took her from the slums of Cairo to the iron mines of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; from the oyster beds on the bayou in Houma, La., to Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park; and from the kitchens of Colonial Williamsburg, Va., to the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. In January 2012, Rachel Martin began hosting the program. Previously she served as NPR National Security Correspondent and was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project. She has also been the NPR religion correspondent and foreign correspondent based in Berlin. Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times. Weekend Edition Sunday is heard on WUSF and other NPR Member stations across the United States and around the globe via NPR Worldwide. The conversation between the audience and the program staff continues throughout the social media world.

Sunday 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM on WUSF 89.7

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Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2012, Martin started as National Security Correspondent for NPR in May 2010. In that position she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to... Read More...

From Weekend Edition (Sunday)

  • Strange Sounds, Burial Grounds And The Case Of The Twisted Dreamcatcher
    <p>Creaky doors and squeaky floorboards are part of the territory of an old house. But what about the unexplained sounds that come and go?</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=498386898' />
  • Police Facial Recognition Databases Log About Half Of Americans
    <p>A new report from Georgetown Law's Center on Privacy and Technology says all it takes is a driver's license to be included in the searchable databases. Rachel Martin talks to co-author Alvaro Bedoya.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042369' />
  • Trump Supporters Point To Gore-Bush As A Precedent For Refusal Of Election Results
    <p>Some supporters of Donald Trump look to the election of 2000, when Al Gore conceded to George W. Bush not once but twice — five weeks apart. NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving explains.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042355' />
  • Monthly Song Project Gives The Raveonettes Freedom Of 'A Blank Slate'
    <p>Members of the Danish rock band, Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo, say their unconvential launch strategy will result in an album that may be "totally schizophrenic, but in a really wonderful way."</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042334' />
  • Small Business Owners Face Pressures Of Minimum Wage Bumps In Big Cities
    <p>Minimum wages are on their way to $15 an hour in New York and California. Workers look forward to the bump. But some small businesses are bracing for a hit to their bottom line.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042319' />
  • Musician Lalin St. Juste On Writing Through Grief
    <p>The singer and lyricist of The Seshen wrote the song "Distant Heart" about the loss of a friend. And while it comes from a place of loss, she says it carries her friend's joy and light, too.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=498870315' />
  • With More Big-Box Stores In Reach, Are Commissaries Still Needed?
    <p>This year the U.S. military spent $1.4 billion to run nearly 240 stores that provide discount groceries to troops. Next year, the Department of Defense wants to cut $200 million from the subsidy.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=498397397' />
  • Young, First-Time Voters Share Views On Election In Two Weeks
    <p>NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with young voters who are going to the polls in a general election for the first time.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042298' />
  • Hark! Who Goes There? Why, It's A Puzzle For A 'Guard'
    <p>This is a game of categories based on the word "guard." For each category given, name something in it starting with each of the letters G-U-A-R-D.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=498984685' />
  • The Next Generation Of Local, Low-Power FM Stations Expands In Urban Areas
    <p>The next wave of low power FM stations is coming on the air. Initially restricted to rural areas because of interference concerns, nearly 2,000 new stations have been approved — many in urban areas.</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=499042383' />

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